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Should I Use A Recruiter?

Should I use a recruiter? Who here loves dealing with recruiters? I know I do! 

Now when I say I love dealing with them – I mean that I love having the opportunity to showcase what I know to navigate them quite effortlessly. Do you have what it takes to deal with these guys? 

Remember what recruiters’ motivations are (and if you’re not aware of them, this is the first thing to consider). This is a job that they do, for targets and quotas that they have to hit. You are part of these targets. 

So, consider this. Recruiters reach out to you with this marvelous “opportunity” (specific attention on the quotes there), where you as the candidate are potentially somewhat interested and/or maybe totally interested (based on what’s been told to you).

Are you asking the right questions to get the true clarity around the opportunity? Have you effectively communicated with them to ensure they were truly acting in your best interest?

I think of job recruiters as non-fiduciary certified financial planners, in a way. They do their jobs, with their own intentions, but not from the true mentality of actually being your advocate (usually). There could be recruiters out there that have your best interest in mind, but overall, this is their job with their objectives. 

Top tips when dealing with recruiters:

1) Simply don’t deal with them! Remember that direct applications are always much more lucrative than engaging a third-party recruiter (this is due to the expense of having the recruiter in the first place). Remember – hard work pays off. Laziness equates to less for you.

2) If you do deal with recruiters: ask the right questions to get the right clarity. They tell you XYZ, but remember, it’s what they’re NOT telling you. Do your homework and ask. 

3) Ask initial upfront questions before you waste your time interviewing. Remember how much hard work interviewing is? Don’t want to find out all the blemishes after the fact of having wasted all this time and effort – right?

4) Do your own due diligence on both the opportunity, and the recruiting company/individual (but more so on the actual opportunity). Recruiters in general are all the same, with the same motivation. Really understand what you’re getting yourself into with informed information. Remember, a well-educated applicant is a successful applicant.

Bottom line: you are your own advocate, and recruiters (like human resources and others in this general realm) are not always advocating for your best interest. Self-advocate for your needs and you will remain a successful (and happy) employee.

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Jobs A Fly (recruiting company)

 

 

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