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Resume Writing Best Practice

Resume writing best practice. How many times have you re-written your resume to tailor it for a job? I bet a lot, right? And it’s incredibly tiring, tedious, and no one likes doing it (including me!). So stop re-writing it a million times! There is little to no value gained by re-writing your resume each time for every single job you want to apply for. Remember also that keywords are only one aspect of having a competitive resume file. 

How much time have you wasted in doing this? I get it – you want your resume to “be the perfect fit for the role” – but you need to remember the focus: ROI (return on investment). Your most value resource is time. The more time you’re wasting, the more time you’re remaining ineffective.

It will always* be about ROI. So, stop wasting time. How do you feel about your time management skills? Do you often feel burdened with lack of time? Is it really lack of time, or inability to effectively manage your time? Remember – we all have the same number of hours in a day. It’s all about how you’re spending those hours. Every minute counts. 

When trying to get maximum ROI without spinning your wheels, write one quality baseline resume – and leverage it to create tailored resumes in under 5 minutes. Your resume writing best practice approach will serve you well in the long run if you take a tactical and methodical approach.

Remember that these roles you’re applying for may not even invest 5 minutes on your application. So why spend anything over a comparable amount of time in applying? If you have solid foundational documents to work from, you won’t need to re-write or spend hours of edits on each application.

Write it effectively – once and leverage it at scale. This is what’s going to get you multiple interviews and options that you’re looking for. Work efficiently to remain effective!

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What is return on investment (ROI)?

 

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